“When Mrs. Computer Becomes the Lawyer” by Francis Ohemeng Anane.

 

It scares me to the bone to think how my sleepless nights reading the lengthy and boring pages of Tuffour v A.G may be in vain. To think how of little use Manso v Aboye will be when all the lands in Accra are computerized such that land guards and corrupt chiefs are unable to unlawfully sell lands to innocent victims.

 

Would I ever get the chance to argue on Owusu v RN Thorne with regards to separate legal entity when Mrs. Computer is making sure that all transactions are scrutinized to the letter?

 

Maybe things won’t get that bad. Maybe I’m being a pessimist scaring folks who have sunk in time and effort in their respective legal careers so as to reap great returns in the future.

 

If only I could brush off these fears but God help me, I cannot.

 

With the rise in computer literacy and software development, would the legal profession continue to retain the esteem it has enjoyed for centuries now? Darn google! That search engine has the answers to about everything. Would clients readily run to us when they can solve their petty legal issues through google and the numerous apps on PlayStore? Nope, I didn’t think so.

 

With the rise in computer literacy and software development, would the legal profession continue to retain the esteem it has enjoyed for centuries now? Darn google! That search engine has the answers to about everything. Would clients readily run to us when they can solve their petty legal issues through google and the numerous apps on Playstore? Nope, I didn’t think so.

 

The only area where we may derive some solace is with criminal and constitutional law. There will ever be the unrepentant robbers and thieves to provide bread for criminal lawyers. Constitutional lawyers would still get the opportunity to argue over the interpretation of the constitution; whether ‘’purport’’ actually means purport or a definition yet to be concocted is in the bosom of the judge. I almost included contract lawyers with their golden geese: oral agreements and part performance. But then who in this modern age would want to muddy himself in the troubles associated with oral contracts?

 

It is welcome to challenge these assertions but do agree with me that we are in the age of information technology where knowledge abounds. Mere empty legalese would not do the job to draw the informed clients. A good friend of mine, in readiness for the possibility of encountering bossy, annoying and belligerent Police officers, has on his smartphone the 1992 Constitution, the Criminal Code and the Police Handbook just in case an officer tries to bully him. The only point where I become relevant to him as a ‘’law student’’ is when these documents conflict or are difficult to understand. I am pretty sure you also have such friends. Not long ago, his Constitution and Criminal Code would have been a lawyer. So I say again, mere legalese won’t do but mastery of the letter and spirit of the law would suffice.

 

If you followed carefully, I have not mentioned when this might happen. The answer is simple; I do not know! It might not even happen.What is the solution for lawyers and law students? Sadly, I do not know that too; I am still finding out. I am sorry if my thoughts appear disjointed or not coherent enough. I am only a perturbed young man. I am still wondering how I would cash my $10,000 suit applying the rule in Donoghue v Stevenson before Mrs Computer and Mr. Robot help the brewery companies fulfill the compliance level laid down by Ghana Standards Authority. A new age is fast approaching.

A new day has come and the million-dollar question is, what will lawyers do?